Don Cheadle and Friends Team Up To Help Sudan
Don Cheadle, George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon and movie mogul Jerry Weintraub, via a partnership with Google, think up to help shed light on the atrocities in the African nation of Sudan.
"Celebrity attention certainly makes a difference for the simple reason that the press will cover something that Hollywood movie stars support whereas the press is likely to ignore the views and even projects of little-known experts on the same subject," says David Shinn, adjunct professor of International Affairs at George Washington University and former U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia and Burkina Faso. "Of course, independent analysts and even think tanks rarely have the money to support a project as expensive as the satellite surveillance system." 
Called “Not On Our Watch,” it is funding the startup phase of the Satellite Sentinel Project that will collect near-real-time satellite images from Sudan. This footage will be analyzed by humanitarian organizations such as the Enough Project and the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative. By: ANN BROWN
 TECHNOLOGY USED AT ITS BEST
- CARTER Magazine
March 17, 2011

Don Cheadle and Friends Team Up To Help Sudan

Don Cheadle, George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon and movie mogul Jerry Weintraub, via a partnership with Google, think up to help shed light on the atrocities in the African nation of Sudan.

"Celebrity attention certainly makes a difference for the simple reason that the press will cover something that Hollywood movie stars support whereas the press is likely to ignore the views and even projects of little-known experts on the same subject," says David Shinn, adjunct professor of International Affairs at George Washington University and former U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia and Burkina Faso. "Of course, independent analysts and even think tanks rarely have the money to support a project as expensive as the satellite surveillance system." 

Called “Not On Our Watch,” it is funding the startup phase of the Satellite Sentinel Project that will collect near-real-time satellite images from Sudan. This footage will be analyzed by humanitarian organizations such as the Enough Project and the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative. By: ANN BROWN

 TECHNOLOGY USED AT ITS BEST

- CARTER Magazine

  1. cashmoney1 reblogged this from cartermagazine
  2. cartermagazine posted this